Top Gear: My 13 Essentials For Every Adventure

James WerbOutdoor Equipment0 Comments

Essentials

Gear choices can vary depending on a wide range of factors. How long am I going to be away? What environment am I travelling through? What type of trip am I taking? Is the weather likely to be good or bad?

Even with all these variables there are some essential items that I wouldn’t be without. These are the first to get put in my pack, around my neck, on my belt or in my pockets wherever I’m going.

Everyone has their own thoughts and preferences when it comes to equipment. These are simply my choices and what has worked for me in the past.

Read More

Shocking Advice: Lightning Safety in the Wilderness

James WerbWilderness Hazards0 Comments

Lightning Safety

Lightning is one of the most dangerous weather conditions that you can encounter while on a wilderness trip. A powerful, electrostatic charge that illuminates the sky, invoking feelings of fear and awe in equal measure.

Your chances of getting struck let alone killed by lightning are remote but that can provide little relief when caught in a dramatic storm. In this article I’ll aim to highlight the dangers surrounding lightning and how you can improve your odds of avoiding being struck.

Read More

How To Stay Warm and Dry in the Wilderness

James WerbOutdoor Clothing, Wilderness Hazards0 Comments

Man keeping warm and dry

Any fool can be uncomfortable, right?

Staying comfortable whatever the weather throws at you takes preparation. Whether it’s a quick day hike or a month long expedition into the wilderness, it’s essential to stay warm and dry.

The human body need to maintain an average core temperature of 37 Celsius (98.6 Fahrenheit).

Dropping just a couple of degrees below this and you could be heading into serious trouble. At 35 Celsius (95 Fahrenheit), you will be on the verge of hypothermia so understanding what causes heat loss and how to maintain your core temperature is vital.

This isn’t just a risk for polar explorers. In fact there’s plenty of cases where hikers have succumbed to the effects of hypothermia in cold, wet conditions after only a few hours on the trail.

Read More